My life in the country with my goats.com site

What Changes Have Come To Gullringstorp Stable??


Before I write about today’s subject , I would first like to thank everyone who has read my blog. I am happy to say that I have had over 300 readers!! Wow! That’s great. Thank you all. I hope that you continue to log on and read about my life in the country with my goats. If you have any requests, anything you would like to see on my blog please let me know and I will try to provide it.  Once again, thank you for reading and please remember,  you are very welcome back to learn more.

Frida turned out to be such a great mother. She kept a close eye on Keriana and Flynn and made sure they were always kept under control. As I mentioned in my earlier post, we really had no real background on Frida. We were told she was 2 or 3 years old and we have since realized she was much older. We also were not told that she had babies before. This accounted for her diligence with her twins. What we did not know was that not only had she had babies before and perhaps many times over, but that she had a condition in her udder known as mastitis. With twins, it really should have been easy for her to nurse them both, at the same time. I realized I never saw both babies nurse at the same time. Then I realized that the two were fighting to get to one teat. This was not the way it was supposed to be. I convinced my husband that we needed to get  the district vet out yo examine her. This really was not a decision made lightly due to the fact that the costs involved when a vet comes to your farm is huge. There are costs for the car driven, petrol, and mileage all on top of the service and any medications needed. There was a problem and i was determined to get to the bottom of it. Well, my suspicions were correct, poor Frida was suffering with a bad previously untreated case of mastitis. She was in pain whenever one of her babies wanted to suckle on the left teat. She was examined and given an antibiotic and pain medication. This did not cure the mastitis, nor did it allow the babies to nurse from both teats. It did allow her to be comfortable when the babies did nurse on the good side. The babies literally pound their heads against the udders to encourage the milk to come down. This bumping action was really uncomfortable for Frida. Once she had her medication, she was much more comfortable. that still left us with potentially hungry babies. They were given a supplemental bottle every 3 hours. That bottle was warm supplemental milk for baby lambs.  This not only nourished the babies and made sure they had what they needed, it allowed us to bond with the babies. I must say, however, that the sight of my new little baby goats suckling at their mother’s teat was just so beautiful. What a sense of peace and safety they were expressing.

Here is a photo of little Keriana enjoying her meal with mommy:

Frida is a great mother, tending to Keriana as she has a meal

Frida is a great mother, tending to Keriana as she has a meal

 

Keriana having a meal

Keriana having a meal

What a sweet sight! See what a good mommy Frida is, providing yummy milk while making sure Keriana is clean.
As the babies grew, they became curious about the food Frida was eating. In addition to her fresh supply of hay and straw and grains, she received a bowl of chopped fruit and veggies twice a day. It was a while before they actually ate some, but they really were curious. Flynn in his beige sweater just enjoyed looking at the interesting bowl of something mommy ate!
Keriana and Flynn are really curious about what mommy eats

Keriana and Flynn are really curious about what mommy eats

Little Flynn just likes to look at the food

Little Flynn just likes to look at the food

By April my little babies were growing so beautifully and were now ready to eat some new food, in addition to mommy’s milk and the supplement lamb milk. Here are Keriana and Flynn just one month later: (they grow really fast!)
Keriana joins her mother at meal time while Flynn seems not to be interested

Keriana joins her mother at meal time while Flynn seems not to be interested

I wonder what Frida was saying to Flynn

I wonder what Frida was saying to Flynn

While my little family was developing and growing as they should, we thought about adding another doe. We found Vit Tas (Swedish for “white paws”) She came by herself and was placed in one of the boxes, by herself. She was lonely and I sat many long hours with her. She could not go in with Frida and her family, nor could she go in with Jalle and Julius. I remember saying , “you’re alright pumpkin”. Well Pumpkin stuck, and she was renamed. She arrived to us as a yearling, one year old. She was still to young, in my book to breed. She is just lovely; not just her physical appearance but her temperament as well. Meet Pumpkin:
Meet Pumpkin

Pumpkin

Pumpkin has a distinctive white stripe and one white foot

Pumpkin has a distinctive white stripe and one white hoof

Pumpkin finally settled in and eventually met Frida and the babies. Things were not so settled, however in the boys box. Jalle and Julius were out of control. They matured and hit their heat and were beyond control. It was only after long deliberation and assessment of the situation, we decided they needed a different home.  It was one of the hardest decisions I have had to make. I had fallen in love with these little bucks but realized that they were becoming uncontrollable and potentially dangerous. We contacted the previous owner and thought that over this past year, perhaps his life had become more settled. We thought he should have the first option of taking them back. He did not want them. I wanted only West African miniature dairy goats and these two bucks did not fit my idea of the herd I was intent to build. They are of a rare Swedish breed and for that reason I attempted to keep them, but soon realized that they needed to be in another home. We placed an ad and got a wonderful response. We gave them to a young couple with land and a stable to accommodate them. We were and are still happy with our choice and feel confident that they are well-loved and cared for as they were at Gullringstorp. Here we prepare to say goodbye to Jalle and Julius:
My husband prepares the trailer to move the boys
My husband prepares the trailer to move the boys
Jalle and Julius in the trailer. They had straw and grain to calm them.
Jalle and Julius in the trailer. They had straw and grain to calm them.
It worked!

It worked!

My boys, Jalle and Julius in their new home

My boys, Jalle and Julius in their new home

Here are the proud new parents / owners of Jalle and Julius

Here are the proud new parents / owners of Jalle and Julius

New owner preparing the enclosure with straw

New owner preparing the enclosure with straw

My husband prepared the trailer for Jalle and Julius. I felt peaceful in my heart because I knew I had made the right decision for our little herd. The young couple had prepared the outdoor enclosure and were ready for their new bucks. Then the fun of getting the boys to come out of the trailer and into the enclosure. They finally came out and started to explore their new home. There is the happy couple and now new owners of Jalle and Julius. The box in the stable is being prepared. We brought a couple of bales of hay and straw, just in case they needed them.
Jalle and Julius are very happy and have settled in well at their new home. I miss them, of course but am still very comfortable with my decision. these two bucks were growing too large and strong for me. So I said no bucks for me. But like they always say, never say never!
Thank you for logging on, reading and I hope you enjoyed!  Feel free to leave a comment, question or suggestion, in either English or Swedish! Please check back and find out what is next for Gullringstorp!

2 responses

  1. Keriana and Flynn are too cute! That snow is *bad* – we lived on a farm and had some pretty bad snow, but this is far worse. Nice blog! 🙂

    June 11, 2011 at 19:14

    • Hej from Sweden,

      Thanks for logging on, reading and enjoying and commenting, thesingleovebird! I think they are just way too cute also, but I am “grandma” so my opinion is a bit biased. Where do you live and do you have animals? Yes our snow is a bit over the top and the temperatures dropping in the south to -22. Everyone stays in the stable until we can see there is no risk of more snow and low temps. Even then it ‘s day to day all through the “Swedish spring”. I planted my kitchen garden with herbs and the very next night there was FROST! I lost several plants. The koi in our pond who survived the long winter under a cover, were uncovered but thought winter had returned and went into their hibernation again!
      I would love to read about where you live.
      Thanks again for logging on, reading, enjoying and commenting. Please check back from time to time when you can and learn more about my life with my goats. There is much more to come.
      gullringstorpgoatgal

      June 11, 2011 at 21:35

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